All Adventure Travel

Adventure travel articles and resources for adventure travelers.

Saturday, February 11, 2006

Shark Cage Diving - the Heart of the Cape Town Adventure Tourism Industry by Sarah Manners

Over the past 350 million years sharks have dominated the oceans of the world. The fiercest predators in their domain, sharks have earned their reputation as the hunters of the sea. Humans have become fascinated by them and have a healthy combination of fear and respect for these beautiful creatures.


South Africa, more specifically Cape Town, is without a shadow of a doubt, one of the best destinations worldwide for experiencing sharks, especially Great White sharks, at close proximity. The population of sharks is unparalleled elsewhere, and the locations are so accessible and in close proximity to land, that you are virtually guaranteed to witness numerous animals engaging in what they were born to do.


The Adventure of a Lifetime

Shark cage diving and surface viewing has become increasingly popular within the adventure tourism industry over the past decade. It is the experience of a lifetime being able to witness these magnificent animals in their natural habitat.


Each year thousands of people travel the globe to see and dive with the 400 species of shark in our oceans. Each year they undertake this adventure with apprehension and excitement and each time return with a passion and deep seated respect for these fascinating creatures.


Swim with the Sharks

Shark cage diving is a strictly regulated industry, with only a few operators having been granted a license to engage in this activity. Great care is taken not to interfere too much with the natural behaviour patterns of the sharks. The feeding of sharks is also strictly prohibited, to prevent them from associating boats with an easy meal.


Passengers on the shark cage trips are most likely to experience Great Whites as other sharks tend to keep a low profile in their territories. The Cape Coast is one of the most famous Great White territories world wide.


On boarding the boat for the trip out to sea, the passenger's anticipation is overwhelming. It can take up to an hour of chumming before the first shark appears. Once the sharks have settled down, the first group of cagers prepare to enter their cage while the rest retreat to the back of the boat or viewing platform to witness the spectacular proceedings, eagerly awaiting their turn in the cage.


The bait line is slowly drawn towards the cage. As the bait line approaches so too does the Great White. The cage experience has been described by some as an emotional, heart-stopping and truly thrilling experience.


The experience is not only thrilling for those in the cage. The passengers on the boat are able to enjoy the surface viewing from an unparalleled viewpoint and to observe and photograph the Great White sharks from only a few feet away. Surface viewing here is amazing as passengers get an all-round view of the sharks attacking, circling and descending.


Shark Cage Diving Locations

There are two areas where Great White diving is done, Gans Bay and Mossel Bay. Both these destinations are easily reached by land or air from Cape Town International Airport. Both destinations are also major tourist hot spots and accommodation and restaurants are of an excellent standard.


The best time of year for Great White viewing is between April and November mainly due to the mass-pupping of seals. Sharks are a little less active between December and March but are not completely absent from the areas. During caging and viewing trips Great White sharks are encountered 95% of the time, on a good day upwards of a dozen Great White sharks ranging between 2, 5 and 4, 5 meters may be encountered.


There are a multitude of companies operating shark tours in and around Cape Town many specialising in specific sightings because of where they are based. On most of the tours you will be able to experience many other aspects of marine life apart from the sharks: schools of dolphins; seals; penguins; bird life and occasionally whales


Experience the Thrill

Whether sharks intrigue, fascinate or frighten you, it is the experience of a life time being so close to them and observing them in their natural habitat. Being with these mighty kings of the deep is one of the most popular activities in adventure tourism at the moment. Whether you wish to dive with Great Whites or simply view them from afar, Cape Town is the perfect location for you.

About the Author

Shark cage diving is once in a lifetime opportunity for shark lovers and adventure junkies alike. Experience the ultimate thrill whilst diving with ragged-tooth sharks, a turtle, rays and game fishes in the I&J predator exhibit at the Two Oceans Aquarium in Cape Town.

Thursday, January 26, 2006

Shark Cage Diving - The Heart of the Cape Town Adventure Tourism Industry by Sarah Manners

Over the past 350 million years sharks have dominated the oceans of the world. The fiercest predators in their domain, sharks have earned their reputation as the hunters of the sea. Humans have become fascinated by them and have a healthy combination of fear and respect for these beautiful creatures.


South Africa, more specifically Cape Town, is without a shadow of a doubt, one of the best destinations worldwide for experiencing sharks, especially Great White sharks, at close proximity. The population of sharks is unparalleled elsewhere, and the locations are so accessible and in close proximity to land, that you are virtually guaranteed to witness numerous animals engaging in what they were born to do.


The Adventure of a Lifetime

Shark cage diving and surface viewing has become increasingly popular within the adventure tourism industry over the past decade. It is the experience of a lifetime being able to witness these magnificent animals in their natural habitat.


Each year thousands of people travel the globe to see and dive with the 400 species of shark in our oceans. Each year they undertake this adventure with apprehension and excitement and each time return with a passion and deep seated respect for these fascinating creatures.


Swim with the Sharks

Shark cage diving is a strictly regulated industry, with only a few operators having been granted a license to engage in this activity. Great care is taken not to interfere too much with the natural behaviour patterns of the sharks. The feeding of sharks is also strictly prohibited, to prevent them from associating boats with an easy meal.


Passengers on the shark cage trips are most likely to experience Great Whites as other sharks tend to keep a low profile in their territories. The Cape Coast is one of the most famous Great White territories world wide.


On boarding the boat for the trip out to sea, the passenger's anticipation is overwhelming. It can take up to an hour of chumming before the first shark appears. Once the sharks have settled down, the first group of cagers prepare to enter their cage while the rest retreat to the back of the boat or viewing platform to witness the spectacular proceedings, eagerly awaiting their turn in the cage.


The bait line is slowly drawn towards the cage. As the bait line approaches so too does the Great White. The cage experience has been described by some as an emotional, heart-stopping and truly thrilling experience.


The experience is not only thrilling for those in the cage. The passengers on the boat are able to enjoy the surface viewing from an unparalleled viewpoint and to observe and photograph the Great White sharks from only a few feet away. Surface viewing here is amazing as passengers get an all-round view of the sharks attacking, circling and descending.


Shark Cage Diving Locations

There are two areas where Great White diving is done, Gans Bay and Mossel Bay. Both these destinations are easily reached by land or air from Cape Town International Airport. Both destinations are also major tourist hot spots and accommodation and restaurants are of an excellent standard.


The best time of year for Great White viewing is between April and November mainly due to the mass-pupping of seals. Sharks are a little less active between December and March but are not completely absent from the areas. During caging and viewing trips Great White sharks are encountered 95% of the time, on a good day upwards of a dozen Great White sharks ranging between 2, 5 and 4, 5 meters may be encountered.


There are a multitude of companies operating shark tours in and around Cape Town many specialising in specific sightings because of where they are based. On most of the tours you will be able to experience many other aspects of marine life apart from the sharks: schools of dolphins; seals; penguins; bird life and occasionally whales.


Experience the Thrill

Whether sharks intrigue, fascinate or frighten you, it is the experience of a life time being so close to them and observing them in their natural habitat. Being with these mighty kings of the deep is one of the most popular activities in adventure tourism at the moment. Whether you wish to dive with Great Whites or simply view them from afar, Cape Town is the perfect location for you.

About the Author

Shark cage diving is once in a lifetime opportunity for shark lovers and adventure junkies alike. Experience the ultimate thrill whilst diving with ragged-tooth sharks, a turtle, rays and game fishes in the I&J predator exhibit at the Two Oceans Aquarium in Cape Town.

Friday, December 23, 2005

Understanding Adventure Travel by M. Ellis

What, exactly, is Adventure Travel?"


In many ways, coming up with an adequate answer to that question is like trying to explain the concept of infinity. But I have reached several conclusions that should lead you down the right track even though you may find the answer rather elementary.


If we follow the dictionary, the two keywords involved - adventure and travel - are easily defined. The term travel is a concept that needs no introduction to anyone, but adventure, alas, is not as straight forward and hence involves some cognitive elements of perception.


In other words, the term adventure can mean different things to different people depending on their very own perceptions and taste. A trek in the country side might be a form of adventure travel to some, but to a mountain climber, it is nothing more than a walk in the country side!


As poet Ralph Waldo Emerson put it, "It is not length of life, but depth of life (that counts)...". So life is as you make it and see it really. You can choose to keep is simple, or become repetitive, boring and common, or you can make life and see it as a grand adventure in itself.


Applying this same concept to travel, we can keep it simple, repetitive and common, by following the masses and going to the usual big cities such as London, Paris or New York - or we can make something which for us is extra ordinary, and have an Adventure Travel. The choice, as always, is ours to make.


Are we getting anywhere?


For some, Adventure Travel equates to grabbing the whitewater kayak and heading down to the river, or securing a bungee cord to your ankle and jumping off the bridge. To others, mixing with the local culture up the amazon river in the tiny villages there.


If you ask a punter at the Rio Carnival why they are there, chances are they will tell you, for the Adventure of it. Ask a diver why they choose to dive and you will get a similar answer. Ask someone following the Inca Trail and again they will most likely tell you for the Adventure or it. If you asked me when I was about 10 why I climbed the hill and climbed over the fields, knowing I shouldn't have, while my mum sunbathed unknowingly at the beach, I would have told you "for the adventure"


Floating in the clouds in a hot air balloon is an adventure. So is a cruise to the exotic Galapagos. But even whisking the family away to a nearby theme park can be an Adventure to some. To some, a truly grand adventure involves viewing wildlife or spending time camping under the stars. To others, an escape to gambling world Las Vegas makes their adrenaline flow, and brings the Adventure demon inside them to life.


Adventures come in all shapes and sizes. Big and small. Soft or hard. There is no limit, no rule.


Hopefully by now you are getting it. An adventure, whether passive or active, is the difference between common and uncommon; between normal and beyond normal. Try camping out in a spooky cemetery at night and tell me afterwards that, that was not an adventure! Or go visit the Pyramids of Giza, and tell me you havn't been fantasizing about our ancient past.


Simply put, an Adventure Travel is really discovering what turns you on the most far within your soal. Adventure Travel is only limited to your very own imagination and physical constraints. It doesn't matter if your sense of adventure is walking through an unexplored path between the fields behind your house, or if you climb Mount Everest. Adventure travel is what you make it - nothing more and nothing less.


WishToTravel.com - Experience the Adventure!
http://www.wishtotravel.com
About the Author

Articles provided by http://www.wishtotravel.com - an Adventure Travel Resource providing articles, destination guides & hundreds of tours for people wanting an adventure holiday.


Visit Adventure Travel for more information

Tuesday, December 20, 2005

Adventure Travel in Nepal by John Riggin

With its majestic Himalayan Mountains and fascinating local culture, Nepal is a favorite destination for adventurous travelers. Each year thousands embark upon the experience of a lifetime to spend days or weeks in the breathtakingly beautiful country of Nepal.


Most adventure travelers in Nepal will be treated to magnificent views from high in the mountains. They will wander through pure forests and past clear mountain lakes, rivers and waterfalls. They'll visit remote Buddhist monasteries and shrines and see tiny mountain villages, full of friendly locals.


Trekking expeditions in Nepal are quite popular. They typically involve a small group of people who have been given a list of equipment, such as hiking boots, to bring with them to Nepal. Once they arrive in the country they set off together to explore. There is usually a trekking staff that comes along on the trip and carries most of the camping equipment and even the travelers' bags. They set up the camp, cook meals and break camp, leaving the traveler to enjoy the trek without the physical hardship of toting heavy packs.


Treks are available for people with various abilities. While a person should be in good shape for these treks, one does not need to be a tri-athlete to take part. There are more strenuous treks for those in great physical condition, as well as easier treks. Many of the easier treks are appropriate for families and allow children to participate. Some companies rate the treks they offer by level of difficulty, to help travelers judge which trek would be best for them.


While trekking is one of the most popular forms of adventure travel in Nepal, it is by no means the only one. There are many ways to enjoy the great outdoors in beautiful and mysterious Nepal.


- The Himalayas make Nepal a favorite destination for mountain climbers. There are well over 100 peaks open to mountain climbers in Nepal, including the famed Mount Everest.


- The mountains of Nepal also have trails for mountain bikers of varying skills.


- Nepal offers challenging climbing cliffs for avid rock climbers.


- While rafting and kayaking in Nepal, adventurers can float along picturesque mountain rivers enjoying tranquil views, far from the well-traveled paths.


- Finally, adventure travelers in Nepal can choose to experience a jungle safari from a jeep or the back of an elephant.


Nepal's wildlife reserves and conservation areas boast a variety of unique animals, including the Royal Bengal Tiger and the Greater One Horned Rhinoceros.
About the Author

John Riggin is Executive Editor for http://www.SeeYouInAsia.com the largest travel to Nepal website. Delivering a comprehensive range of vacation packages, travel information and more, tailored for the American travel consumer.

The Cobra Tandem Kayak - A Review by Niall Barco

The Cobra tandem kayak offers unmatched flexibility. It allows you to use it with another person for whatever your adventure is.


Tandem has built various kayak models but none of them can compete with the Cobra Tandem kayak. This kayak is one of the best currently on the market, certainly one of the most stable! Whatever the reason is that you are buying a kayak, the Cobra Tandem will be perfect for you. It is suitable for all your recreational adventures.


The Cobra Tandem is among the lightest kayaks available. It is lighter that any other in the tandem collection, weighing a mere 57 pounds. Weight is an important factor in selecting a kayak. Heavier kayaks are often harder to maneuver than lighter ones. Also, a lightweight kayak is easier to transport and load onto the roof of your vehicle. Easier travel makes it more likely that you will want to go places with your kayak.


The Cobra is made with a front and a rear seat, with room in the middle for another seat. You might find it useful to invest proper seating rather than the seating supplied as it is a bit basic. It is designed to let you socialize while you paddle. This aspect makes your kayak experience so much more enjoyable and comfortable.


With plenty of underdeck storage room for cargo and accessories, your kayak can give you an enjoyable day trip! The Cobra tandem is among the few kayaks that can go on flat water, on the ocean and can be used for surf kayaking. You can have a large amount of fun time in the Cobra tandem. It is perfect for anybody!


If you have been looking for the best kayak, look no more. The Cobra tandem is absolutely perfect regardless of what your plans for it are. The Cobra is not expensive. Even though it seats three people, it is lightweight! You won't find a better kayak. With a name like tandem on to it, it must be good! You will risk nothing with this kayak; you will fall in love with it at first sight!



About the Author

Canoes and Kayaks Information will help you with great deals, tips and news, information and reviews about all aspects of boating.
Copyright http://www.canoesandkayaks.info

Monday, November 28, 2005

Ethiopia Tour by Andrew Muigai

Ethiopia is an enchanting country whose delights are unknown to most travelers. And yet this is a truly unique destination with such attractions as can be found nowhere else in the world. The biggest draw is the rich Orthodox Christian heritage. Ethiopia was one of the very first nations to embrace Christianity, way back in the 4th century AD. The wonderful churches, monasteries, icons and relics to be found here is a reminder of the central role the Church has played in the history of the country. The painstaking effort summoned to produce some of these tokens of mans faith in God is very impressive, especially for non-believers.

Ethiopia is a very worthy destination and many connoisseurs consider it to be Africa's best-kept secret. Since so few outsiders come here, the tourist infrastructure is not well developed. But on the plus side, there are no crowds of visitors, unlike at other historical destinations such as Egypt. The Christian heritage aside, Ethiopia is blessed with an astonishing contrast of nature's gifts. This ranges from the heights of the jagged peaks of the Simien mountains- a UNESCO World Heritage Site, the bird filled rift valley lakes, to the under sea level lunarscape of the Danakil Depression.

Travelers have plenty of opportunities to enjoy mountain treks, caving, camping, sailing and white water rafting adventures. Though not as abundant as elsewhere in east Africa, there is plenty of wildlife, and 31 rare species are only found in Ethiopia. This is also one of Africa's great birding destinations and 861 species have been recorded of which 16 are endemic. Due to the relatively undeveloped tourist infrastructure, the best way to see the country is by buying a packaged Ethiopia tour.

Most overseas visitors will start off from Addis Ababa. Addis, as the city is popularly known is the capital city and home to Bole International Airport. The city rests at the foot of the Entoto Mountains. By Ethiopian standards, it is a new settlement and came into being in 1887. Addis Ababa means New Flower and its foundation is credited to Queen Taitu - consort to Menelik II. In Addis, make sure to visit the Ethnographic Museum and the National Museum. The Giorgis Cathedral, which was built in 1896 to commemorate victory over Italian invaders,
is also worth a visit.

The Simien Mountains National Park is much favored by trekkers. The park has some of the scenic sights in the country. The mastiff reaches to 4620m, the highest point in the country. The park was created to protect the Walia Ibex, which is found only in Ethiopia. Other endemic animal species in the park are
Gelada Baboon and Simen Fox. Bale Mountains in the southeast, though less accessible, has trekking opportunities and some wildlife including a few endemic species.

Awash National park is one of the finest and most accessible reserves in the country. The Awash River strides the park before heading to the Dankil depression where it vanishes, never to reach the sea. Some special attractions in the park
include the Awash Falls, the dormant Fantale volcano and some thermal springs. Forty-six species of wildlife have been identified here and the bird life is prolific. The park is located just 211 km to the east of Addis.

You will obtain best value for your Ethiopia trip if you have at least an interest in the unique history of the country. The country claims a history going back 5,000 years, and there are Bible episodes mentioning Ethiopia that are dated at least 3,000 years ago. The colorful history is a blend of fact, legend, and tradition. Some incidents dearest to Ethiopians and which they use to affirm unique their place in the world, on close examination appear to be apocryphal. The legend that the Ark of the Covenant is housed in Axum is certainly controversial. But most of the history is almost certainly correct and remains unchallenged.

Despite earlier contact with the outside world, Ethiopia developed in relative isolation and was actually once known as the "Hidden Empire". As a result, some of the living culture is unique to the country and has origins dating back hundreds of years. The Ge'ez language used in most modern day church
services derives from the Kingdom of Axum. Ge'ez alphabet has an amazing 231 letters. The country still uses the Julian calendar, which has 12 months of 30 days each and an additional month of 5 days, with 6 days in a leap year. Relative to the Gregorian calendar used in the west, Ethiopia is 7 years behind
between 11th September and 8th January and 8 years for the rest of the year.

Festivals of the Orthodox Church are an ingrained part of popular culture. Timket, feast of Epiphany, is a colorful 3-day festival commemorating the baptism of Jesus by John the Baptist in the Jordan River. Meskal, celebrates the "finding of the true cross" upon which Jesus was crucified, by Empress Helana -mother to Constantine the Great. It is believed that a fragment of the True Cross is to be found in a monastery in Gishen Mariam. Meskal has been celebrated in the country for over 1600 years. Other Orthodox festivals include the Ethiopian
New Year (Enkutatash) and Christmas (Lidet).

Though a friendly people, Ethiopians are fiercely independent and even today appear to distrust outsiders a little bit. This may appear justified when you consider that foreigners such as the British and Italians are guilty of looting historical relics. The Italians carried off to Rome a 150-tonne granite obelisk from Axum, when they occupied the country between 1936-41. Mussolini had sought a rematch of the 1896 defeat by Ethiopia that had greatly humiliated Italian patriots. The British had earlier in 1868 stolen priceless illuminated manuscripts, crowns, crosses, and other treasure. Ethiopia has been waging a campaign to have the artifacts returned.


Most of the historical treasures date from time King Azena of Axum converted to Christianity in the 4th century AD. The highlights of the "Historic Route" are Debre Libanos, Debre Markos, Bahar Dar, Gondar, Axum, Lalibela and Harar. You can reach these sites by air or car, or a combination of both. The route starts at Debre Libanos, 110 km from Addis Ababa. Here in the 13th century, Saint Tekle Haymanot performed a fantastic feat- he stood on one leg for 7 years! A cathedral marks the spot where this happened.

In 1937, during the Italian occupation, the monks of Debre Libanos annoyed the Fascist overlord who ordered the execution of 297 of them. If you are traveling by road, you can pause at Debre Markos, 305 km north of Addis to see the church of Markos with its beautiful paintings of Biblical scenes.

Bahar Dar is located on the shores of Lake Tana and is 560 km from Addis Ababa. The 3,000 sq km Lake Tana is Ethiopia's biggest and is the source of the Blue Nile. Just 30 km after leaving Lake Tana, over a maximum width of 400m, the Blue Nile drops over 45 m. The result is the phenomenon of the Blue Nile Falls, otherwise known to locals as Tississat or "Smoke of Fire". The falls are a spectacular sight and the spray mist produces rainbows and rainforest vegetation that forms a habitat to monkeys and many colourful birds.

Lake Tana has 37 islands, some of which harbor churches and monasteries. These buildings carry beautiful murals and paintings, remains of emperors, church crosses, icons, manuscripts, crowns and other articles of historical and cultural significance. Some of the monasteries such as Kebrane Gabriel preserve ancient customs and do not allow entry for women. You can break your historical tour by sailing on the Tana. Boats are available for hire at Bahar Dar. The lake
is also a delight for bird watchers. Flights are available to Bahar Dar, and some reasonable quality hotels too.

Gondar is 748 km to the northwest of Addis and rests on the foothills of the majestic Simien Mountains. Founded by Emperor Fasilidas, it was the 17th century capital of Ethiopia. Noteworthy attractions here are the cathedrals, castles, and other imperial buildings that were built by Fasilidas and his succcessors. The architectural style combines Axumite, medieval European and Arabian influences. An Indian architect designed the most magnificent of them. For Cathedrals, the most impressive is the hilltop positioned Debre Berhan Selassie (Trinity Church of the Mountain of Light). The city declined after 1855 when Tewodros II removed his capital to Debre Tabor and was subsequently looted in the 1880's.

Axum, one of the key stops on the historical routes, dates back at least 2,000 years. The ancient city is particularly important in the history of the Orthodox Church, as it was the seat of King Azena when he converted to Christianity in the 4th century AD. Every year, the site known as Queen Sheba's bath is the focal point of the ceremony of Epiphany. Archeologist's think that the site and others such as Queen of Sheba Palace were merely named after the famous queen for the city had not been founded in her lifetime.

In its heyday, Axum was a vital and sophisticated kingdom that produced the written language that survives to this day known as Ge'ez. Though Axum is mostly identified with its trademark monolithic stelae, it has other important ruins such palaces and imperial tombs. The stelae were carved from single blocks of stone as markers of the burial places of kings. These were the biggest monolith structures ever made anywhere in the world. Out of the 11 identifiable large stelae, only one stands today at 24 m. In 1937, the Italian dictator Mussolini ordered one of the structures to be dismantled and raised again in Rome.

Axum is also known for the 17th century Cathedral of St Mary of Zion. Legend has it that the original Ark of the Covenant is housed here. The monks jealously guard this treasure and do not allow anybody to view it. This stand has led to much speculation that this object of immeasurable historical and religious value may not actually be in the hands of the monks of St Mary of Zion.

Lalibela is renowned for its marvelous 11 rock hewn churches built in the 12th century AD. The very devout King Lalibela commissioned them, not as monuments, but really as an act of worship. The churches were each carved from a single block of stone. Some are in trenches below ground; while others are built in open quarry caves. Legend has it that the churches were built with great speed because angels continued working the night shift while mortals slept. The result was truly magnificent and the very learned people at UNESCO have declared Lalibela a World Heritage Site. The churches are living monuments and are still in use today. Of all the historic attractions, Lalibela is the one you should not miss.

Harar, unlike other centres on the historic route is associated with Islam. The town with its city wall, towers and narrow streets has the feel of Arabian Nights about it. Founded in 1520, the city is 523 km to the east of Addis. It is an important centre of Islamic learning and has all of 99 mosques. Indeed it is believed to rank fourth in the ranking of holy cities of Islam after Mecca, Medina and Jerusalem. The first Muslims are said to have reached Ethiopia in the lifetime of prophet Mohamed. The city is also famous for its handicrafts,
colorful woven baskets, and silverware. It was also once the home of the French poet Rimbaud.

If the evening finds you in Harar, you may witness a most bizarre spectacle courtesy of the so-called Hyena Men. With wild howls, these fearless men summon hyenas from the hills. They then get the ruthless scavengers to snatch pieces of meat from their hands or even their mouths!

In the east of the country towards the Dankil Depression and to the west near Sudan, the climate is very hot and dry. The central highland region is temperate, and nights can get chilly. Rains come twice a year- the rather irregular short
rains from January to March and the long rains from June to September. The best time to visit Addis and the highlands region is the dry October - June period. The traveler is advised to dress very light in the lowlands and desert country.
In the highland region, temperatures average 16°C and warmer clothing comes in handy at night and early morning.

Some Addis Ababa hotels are of international standard. A few other towns and locations on the Historical Route and other tourist attractions also offer reasonable accommodation. Unlike in other countries that receive many tourists, the budget traveler will find accommodation rates to be very reasonable.

Copyright © Africa Point

About the Author

Andrew Muigai is editor of AfricaPoint Insider online newsletter. It is part of AfricaPoint.com- the Africa travel website that has helped thousands of travelers discover Africa. You can view more info on Tanzania safari and tours at the website.


Africa Adventure Travel Info

Monday, September 19, 2005

Ten Best Backpacking Foods by Steve Gillman

Maybe your favorite backpacking food is a freeze-dried turkey dinner. There really is no "best" backpacking food. There are reasons to bring certain foods, though. Here are ten foods, and the reasons you might want to consider them.

1. Nuts. This is one of the most calorie-packed foods you can take. That means less weight to carry. With lots of protein and other nutritonal benefits, nuts are one of the best backpacking foods.

2. Olive oil. Add a little to your soups or dip bread in it. The best of the oils health-wise, you can eat it before sleeping, to stay warm, because fats generate heat when digested.

3. Trail mixes. Any mix with raisins and nuts is great for backpacking. Vitamins, minerals, protein, and the best reason - convenience.

4. Corn products. Tortilla chips or corn nuts are convenient, and they don't seem to cause the tiredness that potato chips and other simple carbohydrates can cause.

5. Ramen noodles. When you need a hot meal fast, there isn't much that's better.

6. Instant coffee. A necessity for caffeine addicts, and it's good to have a stimulant available for emergencies.

7. Wild edible berries. Learn to identify a few, and you'll have a nutricious excuse for a break along the trail.

8. Instant sports drinks. Pour a little in your water bottle and shake. Replacing electrolytes doesn't get more convenient.

9. Instant refried beans. When you want sustained energy, eat beans.

10. Your favorites. Having your favorite foods can help salvage a rainy backpacking trip spent in the tent.

Always consider the nature of the trip when you choose your backpacking food. Hot meals are much more important in cold climates, and convenience is king, if you want to make miles. A bottle of rum might even be appropriate, if it's a trip wih friends.

About the Author


Steve Gillman is a long-time backpacker, and advocate of ultralight backpacking. His advice and stories can be found at http://www.TheBackpackingSite.com

Click here for Cheap Adventure Travel Links

Tuesday, August 30, 2005

What Should You Know About Hiking Boots? by Diana Claire

What is essential equipment for you when going on a hiking? Beside, your backpack, you also have to consider about your footwear. You will be suffering when you are not using your footwear properly. It seems all physical activity, especially hiking need good footwear.

Physical Activity Need Good Boots

Ask your friends to hike with you! Hiking is one of the way to know more about your friends and also a good way to make your body and your spirit healthy. There are more you get though; but all of that will fade away if you don't wear good hiking boots. Understand that all outdoor physical activity will be enjoyable if you wear good boots. As people said, if you're nice to your feet, the rest of your body will feel good--especially during a hike.

What ever your outdoor physical activity, either a light day hike to a three-pack or four-day pack trip, your hiking boots makes the difference. Hiking boots is one of the most important pieces of gear when hiking. To keep your feet comfortable, you must wear a boot that fit with your feet boot to avoid blister and foot-injury.

Choosing Your Boots

How to find a good hiking boots for your feet to make you comfortable. Well, here are some check lists you might want to know about hiking boots:

- Decide what type of hiking boot you want to choose. You can find two types of boots on the market, leather boots and lightweight hiking boots. Leather boots are more expensive, but they are tend to be more durable and last longer, and can be waterproofed. Lightweight boots tend to be more breathable, more comfortable, cheaper, and require a shorter break-in time. Even though, most important for both types of boots should have good ankle support.

- Don't choose the hiking boots of your normal size. You have to go up a 2 size with your normal shoe size. When you put on your hiking boot, you should be able to put a finger between your foot and the heel of the boot since your feet swell as they warm up.

- If you want to try hiking boots, do it when you have warm feet. Walk at least half mile before you try it on. That way your foot will be more the size it will be when you are actually hiking.

- Don't forget to wear two hiking socks. It's the best way to prevent blisters and an uncomfortable foot while hiking. Two pairs of socks will not only give you good padding, but will also wick the moisture away from your foot as well.

- Once you have the shoe on, lace the boot up. Don't lace it too tightly, but just snugly. Walk around the store and see how they feel. In particular, make sure that your heel can slide around slightly. The boot should be comfortable but stiff.

- Your toes should not hit the front of the boot too much. To simulate walking down a hill bang the toe of the boot on the ground or against a wall. Your toe shouldn't hit the front of the boot too easily. If it does, either your boot is too small or your laces aren't snug enough. Your boots should feel a little big.

Get Your Boots through Internet

Okay...now you know some information about this hiking boots. You can find various kind of hiking boots in retailer shop. But the easiest ways to find your hiking boots are buying over the Internet. You will be comfortable choosing the right boots for your right. Different kind of boots will be displayed in different Website, and you can find what boots best for your interest. You are going to get more boots which you can compare.

About the Author

Diana Claire lifelong for footwear led her became footwear reviewer. She has tried different kind of footwear, and she put her review at MyShoesGuide.com. Visit her Website http://www.myshoesguide.com. You can also visit her http://www.mybootsguide.com


Student Adventure Travel Links